Welcome Carla St Clair

Office Manager Carla St Clair
Office Manager Carla St Clair

Web Pro Help is thrilled to welcome Office Manager Carla St Clair to our staff!

About Carla: In addition to managing the office, Carla also handles all of the invoicing and billing needs for the office. Born in Williamsport, PA and raised in Virginia and West Virginia, Carla moved west in 2005. Carla studied accounting and business management at Sante Fe Community College. She brings great energy to Web Pro Help every day.In her free time, Carla enjoys spending time with her young daughter and family. She also enjoys shopping, watching movies, and going to the parks.If you have any invoice/billing questions, email her at Carla@WebProHelp.com.

Time to Upgrade Your Frontpage Website

Time to upgrade your Frontpage website!
By Lori Bratz
WebProHelp.com

Picture of a clockIn the late 90’s and early 2000’s millions of websites were created in a program called FrontPage, which was discontinued by Microsoft in 2006.

If you were one of those people then the main worry about your website is that your hosting provider will eventually NOT support Front Page extensions (the code and configuration necessary on the web server to run a front page website) and your site will be dead.

In the fullness of time, as your hosting provider upgrades its servers and technology, they will move forward and will not support old technology.

It would be better to take care of this before it’s an emergency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Words Are Worth a Thousand Pictures!

Be sure your designer creates your website with text in mind, organized in managable, easily distinguised boxes or paragraphs with lots of keyword-rich headline h1 tags. You need to have lots and lots of real, searchable keyword-rich text on your site, especially on the homepage. Your homepage should contain samples of every bit of content you care to place on every page of your website. Not just -links, but nice descriptive paragraphs. Keyword-rich text text text all around. Google spiders should visit your site and eat up tons and tons of text and index you with loads of valid, solid information. Text that is written for the web isn’t as lovley or poetic as it is for print, but it’s essential that it be very straightforward, direct and descriptive.

How To Start Your Own Business: Legal Eagle’s Advice

by: Cecile C. Weich, Counselor at Law
I write this article for all frustrated executives, born-again housewives and all women who want to start their own business.
DO YOUR HOMEWORK! RESEARCH YOUR MARKET! AND MOST IMPORTANT: HIRE A LAWYER!

The lawyer will advise you in the intricacies of being an entrepreneur, should you be a corporation or an incorporated business entity. Remember, you will pay taxes on both business forms, but one may be less expensive than the other and more beneficial to your type of business. If you are doing business with a corporation, you may want to be a corporation for appearance sake. Your attorney must work with your accountant (the next person to hire along with your attorney), to determine whether your business should be a corporation.

Your personal assets may be involved at this juncture. Remember, whether or not you are a corporation, no bank will lend you money without collateral and the only collateral you, as a new entrepreneur will have, is your personal collateral, ie: your home, your car, your stocks and bonds. Although technically corporations are formed to avoid personal liability, a new entrepreneur will probably have to put up her own personal assets to secure the initial funding for her business.

After you have researched the market for your business, found a good location, you will be called upon to sign a lease to sign a lease for this location. Again, you must consult with your attorney for the best possible terms to enter into a proper lease with your landlord. Remember, a good lease can make or break your business.

Perhaps you have the kind of business that does not initially require outside space and you want to start up your business in your own home. A service business is uniquely suited for home offices. However, you must consult your accountant so that you take proper tax advantages of this business arrangement.

You must not neglect to speak to an insurance person so that you are properly and adequately covered for business and professional liabilities.

If you want to hire staff, you must consult with all of the professionals, especially your attorney, to determine whether this staff will be “on the books” or independent contractors. You must also consult with your attorney to understand the ramifications of the laws pertaining to sex and age discrimination as it relates to your “shop”.

What about your business equipment? Should you buy it new or used, or should you rent it? Again, you must speak to your attorney and your accountant to find out the best possible tax ramifications for handling office equipment.

Are you confused? Don’t be. If you are really determined to start your own business; if you have that “entrepreneurial spirit”, you are going to make it.

Cecile C. Weich is a Prominent Attorney and Lecturer and one of America’s leading authorities on Women’s Legal Rights. She has been featured and quoted in major publications including The Wall Street Journal, New York Newsday and The National Law Journal, and she has been a guest on many radio and television shows including Court TV, Phil Donahue, The Today Show, MSNBC, CNBC, McGlaughlin Report, Oprah Winfrey, and Larry King Live. Ms. Weich is also co-founder of the New York Association of Women Business Owners and was the New York state representative to the National Women’s Political Caucus, she has been married since 1958 and has two grown sons.

Business Plan Basics

How to write a Business Plan

The following information is an excerpt from the SBA’s website. For more information and the complete article, please visit: http://www.sba.gov/starting/indexbusplans.html

What goes in a business plan? This is an excellent question. And, it is one that many new and potential small business owners should ask, but oftentimes don’t ask. The body of the business plan can be divided into four distinct sections: 1) the description of the business, 2) the marketing plan, 3) the financial management plan and 4) the management plan. Addenda to the business plan should include the executive summary, supporting documents and financial projections.

Elements of a Business Plan
1. Cover sheet
2. Statement of purpose
3. Table of contents

I. The Business
A. Description of business
B. Marketing
C. Competition
D. Operating procedures
E. Personnel
F. Business insurance
G. Financial data

II. Financial Data
A. Loan applications
B. Capital equipment and supply list
C. Balance sheet
D. Breakeven analysis
E. Pro-forma income projections (profit & loss statements)
Three-year summary
Detail by month, first year
Detail by quarters, second and third years
Assumptions upon which projections were based
F. Pro-forma cash flow
Follow guidelines for letter E.

III. Supporting Documents
Tax returns of principals for last three years
Personal financial statement (all banks have these forms)
In the case of a franchised business, a copy of franchise contract and all supporting documents provided by the franchisor
Copy of proposed lease or purchase agreement for building space
Copy of licenses and other legal documents
Copy of resumes of all principals
Copies of letters of intent from suppliers, etc.